skip to content
Closing medical encounters: two physician practices and their implications for the expression of patients' unstated concerns.
ClosePreview this item

Closing medical encounters: two physician practices and their implications for the expression of patients' unstated concerns.

Author: JD Robinson Affiliation: Department of Speech Communication, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park 16802-5201, USA. jdr12@psu.edu
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Social science & medicine (1982) 2001 Sep; 53(5): 639-56
Database:From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
Other Databases: Academic Search CompleteBritish Library Serials
Summary:
When patients visit primary-care physicians, they frequently have more than one concern. Patients' first concerns are solicited by physicians at the beginnings of encounters. A challenge to health care is how to get patients' additional concerns raised as topics of discussion. If patients' additional concerns are addressed, it tends to occur at the end of encounters. Using the methodology of conversation analysis,  Read more...
You are not connected to the Portland State University network. Access to online content and services may require you to authenticate with your library. Off-Campus Login
Getting this item's online copy... Getting this item's online copy...

Find a copy in the library

Getting this item's location and availability... Getting this item's location and availability...

WorldCat

Find it in libraries globally
Worldwide libraries own this item

Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: JD Robinson Affiliation: Department of Speech Communication, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park 16802-5201, USA. jdr12@psu.edu
ISSN:0277-9536
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 120911601
Awards:

Abstract:

When patients visit primary-care physicians, they frequently have more than one concern. Patients' first concerns are solicited by physicians at the beginnings of encounters. A challenge to health care is how to get patients' additional concerns raised as topics of discussion. If patients' additional concerns are addressed, it tends to occur at the end of encounters. Using the methodology of conversation analysis, this article identifies and describes the interactional organization of two physician-initiated communication practices that are used to negotiate the closure of the business of encounters and a transition into the activity of closing encounters themselves. These practices have different implications for the topicalization of patients' additional concerns.
Retrieving notes about this item Retrieving notes about this item

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.